Paying the Price: The Story of My Struggle with Diabetes, Part II

This three-part article was written exclusively for InformationAboutDiabetes.com by Michael Kohel. He discusses his struggle to accept and control his diabetes, the problems he faced and how he finally began to accept diabetes as a manageable part of his life.

Click here to read Part I.

Two years into my diagnosis I found myself on my way to an oilfield job near Green River. I was stopped by a Utah state patrol for speeding and when he got my license and came back and told me it was suspended temporarily for medical reasons. In Utah you need a doctor to certify that your diabetes is in control on a yearly basis so you can drive.

Trial and Error

The state patrol officer followed me to a motel and told me to get it taken care of. I found a doctor near by and he checked my A1c. It was over 14 and he promptly started me on metformin and glimeride. Two days later I checked my blood sugar levels and there were at 140, when I had first seen him they were at about 325. I realized I needed to do something and change my ways.

For the next eight years I found myself struggling with different medications. Some of the medications I tried would make my blood sugar plummet below 50, some had no effect on it at all. I found out some antibiotics can react with diabetic medication and cause highs and lows.

I also discovered that some steroidal medications, like prednisone can cause your blood sugar to sky rocket. Exercise has a big effect on blood sugar levels too, but if I exercised too hard and took my medications without checking my blood sugar, it would plummet. It has been a long battle of trial and error for me.

A Deadly Discovery

After a while the pills stopped working for me as well. In 2008 when I moved to Denver, Colorado to marry the woman of my dreams, I got a primary care doctor, who did a bunch of tests and an MRI. It was then that we discovered that I had a tumor on the adrenal gland, on my right kidney.

My doctor referred me to an endocrinologist who did more tests. The endocrinologist determined that the tumor was affecting my blood sugars level and causing me many other problems as well. She recommended surgery so that I could have the whole adrenal gland and tumor removed.

In Part III of this article series, Michael discusses the outcome of his surgery, how it changed his life, and what he has found useful throughout his battle against diabetes.

Get a Free Diabetes Meal Plan

Get a free 7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan from Constance Brown-Riggs who is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and who is also a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Just enter in your email below to download your free Diabetes Meal Plan.

By clicking Submit, you agree to send your info to InformationAboutDiabetes.com who may contact you with updates and information and we agree to use it according to our privacy policy.

More Articles

Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone), known as the thiazolidinediones, are oral drugs used to treat Type 2...

Regular diabetic testing is essential for proper management of diabetes. Depending on the severity of the diabetes, a diabetic may be...

When diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, many people panic and are concerned that their life is over. In fact, if the...

Oil pulling therapy derives from Ayurveda, a holistic healing system developed thousands of years ago in India. Ayurvedic medicine maintains that...

There are many causes for both male and female hair loss, including heredity, diet and illness. Could taking prescription insulin be one more...

More Articles

Doctors use regular assessments of their diabetic patients not only to monitor the progress of the disease but also as opportunities to counsel...

Every body needs insulin, an essential hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates blood sugar by converting glucose into energy. Diabetics...

People are not the only beings who suffer from diabetes. Any mammal with a pancreas can develop the disease through a lack of or impaired insulin...

When is diabetes not really diabetes? When it is Diabetes Insipidus. Diabetes Insipidus is a rare disorder not related to diabetes mellitus,...

When news stations feature stories about diabetes, they tend to include a shot of an overweight body, calling attention to the person's excess...

The most well-known variations of diabetes are type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes....

Those who have not yet been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can greatly reduce their susceptibility by doing one key...

There are those who have heard of the term "diabetes mellitus," but might not be familiar with it. Diabetes Mellitus is a condition in...

Not only is dry skin uncomfortable, but scratched or cracked skin is also susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections – common medical...

=It’s helpful to know the difference between a food’s total grams of carbohydrate, and net grams of carbohydrate since only net carbs affect blood...

Eating LCHF, or a Low Carb High Fat diet, is a bit mind-bending for those of us who have learned to consume low-fat and lean. In many respects, it...

A 1-minute quiz could predict whether or not you're at risk for prediabetes. More than 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, which - left...

The human body needs chromium, a trace mineral, for several essential functions including the normalizing of...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

It can be difficult enough to get on stage and make a roomful of strangers laugh, but for comedians suffering from type 1 or type 2 diabetes,...