Five Tips for a Diabetic-Friendly Thanksgiving

Turkey Day is almost here, and with it comes the question, "Will I overdo it again this year, or is it possible to have some self-control?"

For diabetics, this question is even more important, as carb-laden, high-calorie eats are central to most holiday feasts.

It is possible to enjoy Thanksgiving and to eat your favorite foods while also being conscientious about your health.

Five Thanksgiving Tips

Follow these basic guidelines as you gear up for Thursday's festivities:

  1. Consider meal timing. Knowing when you're going to eat can help you avoid blood sugar highs and lows. Especially if you take insulin or medication, be sure to time this around your big meal. If dinner gets thrown off schedule, have a snack to prevent a drop in blood sugar.
  2. Get moving. A little exercise on a day of "excess” can help your body cope with the higher caloric intake. Get moving before and after your meal, even if it’s just for a few minutes. Better yet, start a new, active tradition with your family and friends, like a game of flag football in the park, a walk through the woods or a morning run.
  3. Snack wisely. Make sure the foods you snack on before the big meal aren't going to send your blood sugar levels on a roller coaster ride. Opt for raw or blanched vegetables with a low-calorie dip, or stick with a few pieces of low-fat cheese. If you’re going to someone else’s house, bring your own snacks to ensure you have a healthy option.
  4. Control portion size. Carbohydrates are plentiful at the typical Thanksgiving table, so be mindful of your portion sizes. Opt for smaller portions of all your favorite dishes, which will make you feel less deprived than large helpings of just a few things.
  5. Limit alcohol. If you can, avoid alcohol. If not, stick with one glass of red wine, and drink plenty of water (about two glasses for every alcoholic beverage). If you’re mingling near the food, keep a drink in your dominant hand, which will help you from reaching for snacks and overindulging.
  6. Stick with vegetables. Opt for non-starchy vegetables to help you fill up your stomach and avoid too many carbs. Dishes with broccoli, beans, beets, cabbage, eggplant, peas and collard greens are all great Thanksgiving options.

Source: American Diabetes Association

More Articles

Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities....

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

More Articles

Experts estimate that somewhere in the world a person with diabetes will lose a lower extremity every half minute due to a wound. One of the...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Anyone can develop a fungal skin infection, but people with diabetes are more prone to them. A common cause of fungal infections in those with...

Many diabetics struggle to control the sudden blood sugar spikes that can occur after meals. Knowing why blood sugar spikes happen and making...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

People often get diabetes and hypoglycemia confused with one another, believing that they are two different names for the same condition. In...

Diabetes is a health condition that disrupts the body’s normal production of insulin. Currently, more than one million Americans are diagnosed...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

With diabetes, it all used to be really simple: Type 1 diabetes was known as “childhood-onset,” and type 2 was “adult-onset” diabetes. The cause...

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Everyone from grandmothers to physicians tout oatmeal's wholesome goodness and health benefits. But, is oatmeal good for diabetics? Limited...

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

The medical community relies heavily on the goodwill of its citizens, as giving blood and organ donations help save thousands of lives every year...

There are several misconceptions about Diabetes. Learn more about the top misconceptions vs. facts surrounding Type 2 Diabetes below.

86...