Type 2 diabetes increases risk of blood cancers

Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing blood cancers by more than 20 percent, according to the journal Blood.

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island analyzed data from 26 studies that evaluated an association between diabetes and the blood cancers lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma. It included more than 17,000 cases of type 2 diabetes and blood cancer worldwide.

They found that people with type 2 diabetes had a 22 percent increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma compared to people without type 2 diabetes.

There was also an increased risk of a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

Researchers found no associated risk for developing Hodgkin lymphoma.

Unexpected association with blood cancers

“I think when most people think about diabetes-related illnesses, they think of heart disease or kidney failure, but not necessarily cancer,” said lead author Jorge Castillo, MD, hematologist/oncologist in an article by The Miriam Hospital, a major teaching affiliate of Brown University’s Alpert Medical School.

He continued, “But when you consider that more than 19 million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes--not to mention the millions more who are either undiagnosed or will be diagnosed in the future--a 20 percent increased risk of blood cancer is quite significant.”

The statistics suggest that type 2 diabetes could be associated with approximately five percent of all incidents of leukemia, myeloma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Other possible risk factors

The study did not identify a cause for any of these associations.

Researchers say that further studies should evaluate the effect of other factors on the development of blood cancers. Obesity, dietary habits, physical activity, and/or antidiabetic therapy are potential risk factors not evaluated in this study.

“It’s important to remember that type 2 diabetes can, to some degree, be prevented and controlled through lifestyle modification, such as diet and exercise,” said Castillo. “So by preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes, we could also prevent blood cancer.”

The odds of developing lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma differ depending on the geographic region, according to The Miriam Hospital. The rates of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were higher in Asia and Europe, while the odds for developing leukemia are higher in the US and Asia.

Sources: Blood, The Miriam Hospital

More Articles

Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities....

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

More Articles

Experts estimate that somewhere in the world a person with diabetes will lose a lower extremity every half minute due to a wound. One of the...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Anyone can develop a fungal skin infection, but people with diabetes are more prone to them. A common cause of fungal infections in those with...

Many diabetics struggle to control the sudden blood sugar spikes that can occur after meals. Knowing why blood sugar spikes happen and making...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

People often get diabetes and hypoglycemia confused with one another, believing that they are two different names for the same condition. In...

Diabetes is a health condition that disrupts the body’s normal production of insulin. Currently, more than one million Americans are diagnosed...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

With diabetes, it all used to be really simple: Type 1 diabetes was known as “childhood-onset,” and type 2 was “adult-onset” diabetes. The cause...

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Everyone from grandmothers to physicians tout oatmeal's wholesome goodness and health benefits. But, is oatmeal good for diabetics? Limited...

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

The medical community relies heavily on the goodwill of its citizens, as giving blood and organ donations help save thousands of lives every year...

There are several misconceptions about Diabetes. Learn more about the top misconceptions vs. facts surrounding Type 2 Diabetes below.

86...