Keep Your Insulin At A Safe Temp With This Easy To Use Device

Anyone using the temperature sensitive drug insulin might be interested in a temperature tracking device called MedAngel.

Developed by Amin Zayani who has type 1 diabetes, MedAngel ONE is a Bluetooth enabled temperature sensor that transmits to a smartphone app. Users store the sensor with their medications, and are alerted if the storage temperature approaches or exceeds a safe range, putting the medicine’s integrity at risk.

Anyone Can Use

For those a bit behind on technology, Bluetooth is a name for radio frequencies that transmit information wirelessly between devices (e.g., smartphones, computers). The Bluetooth transmissions are picked up and turned into usable information on apps (short for applications). Apps are programs that run on our mobile devices, and computers.

Fortunately, no one has to understand how technology works to use it, and children or grandchildren are typically able to show the family’s technology novices how to use apps such as MedAngel.

Inspired By Experience

The inspiration for MedAngel was Zayani’s experience, four years ago, when repeated insulin injections did not stabilize his blood sugar. It required a hospital visit to correct the elevated glucose, and he was sent home with a fresh supply of insulin.

Upon investigation, Zayani discovered his refrigerator’s temperature fluctuated four degrees above and below the recommended range for insulin storage, compromising his medication’s effectiveness. Zayani’s desire to ensure his health would never again be jeopardized by temperature degraded insulin led to the creation of MedAngel.

The device was designed with setup simplicity, and ease of use in mind. Temperature readings, for instance, are relayed with a heart symbol, and color-based interface. The device has been used in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and in all Scandinavian and European countries by professionals, and individuals.

About the Device

The MedAngel sensor is small (about 1” x 1 5/8”) so takes up little space in refrigerators. It also fits well in insulin pouches or containers when we’re on the go, and is waterproof.

To get started, users select their medication from a list on the app. Then, the safe temperature range for that med is displayed, and the app sends an alert if the sensor detects temps are getting too hot or cold for the medication. Because the app knows both the long and short-term storage recommendations for each med, users select whether they are “storing” or “carrying” their insulin, and the program adjusts accordingly.

Many users have at least two sensors, one for their insulin stock at home (or work), and another for the supply they carry with them. The sensor has a two-year warranty, and its battery life is about nine months. Battery replacements are free.

To learn more, visit the MedAngel website (link below). The device is available through the website, and at Amazon.

Source: MedAngel One; A Sweet Life
Photo credit: domwlive

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