Diabetes Diet: Benefits of Eating Digestive Resistant Starches

Eating foods with digestive-resistant starch (DRS) helps maintain steady blood sugar levels, and may improve insulin sensitivity.

DRS passes through the stomach and small intestine unchanged, and once in our large intestine functions much like soluble fiber. These slowly fermenting starches feed our friendly gut bacteria, increase production of beneficial short-chain fatty acids, and reduce inflammation by lowering the pH level.

Eating Resistant Starch

You may already enjoy the benefits of DRS if you regularly eat:

  • Raw potatoes.
  • Under-ripe bananas, papaya, and mango.
  • Legumes: lentils, white beans, peas, kidney beans, chickpeas.
  • Seeds, cashews, whole grains.
  • Potato starch, tapioca starch, brown rice flour.
  • Potatoes, yams and pastas that are cooked, and cooled (heating and cooling alters the chemical structure).

We can also add DRS to our diet by purchasing raw potato starch (e.g., Bob’s Red Mill Raw Potato Starch). It’s inexpensive, and a tablespoon contains about eight grams of resistant starch. Because of its unobtrusive taste potato starch can be sprinkled on many foods, added to smoothies, or mixed into a glass of water. This is a good way for low-carb dieters to get their DRS.

When using raw potato starch begin slowly, working up to one or two tablespoons per day. Taking too much right away might lead to some abdominal discomfort, and surprising flatulence. It may take at least four weeks to notice any benefit.

Those on a prescribed diet should talk to their doctor or dietitian before imbibing supplemental potato starch.

DRS Benefits for Diabetes

Beside the digestive perks of consuming resistant starch, there may be metabolic benefits helpful for those with pre- or type 2 diabetes:

  • Several studies indicate that DRS effectively lowers post-meal blood sugar levels. Plus, resistant starch has a “second meal effect,” so if you eat it at breakfast it will help minimize blood sugar spikes at lunch.
  • Research suggests consuming 15 to 30 grams of DRS per day, over four weeks, may lead to a 33 to 50 percent insulin sensitivity improvement (reduced insulin resistance).
  • Since resistant starch is not digested and absorbed into the body it gives us fewer calories per gram, so eating more of these foods might help people move past a weight loss plateau. (A hundred grams of food with resistant starch provides about 200 calories; 100 grams of digestible starch is 400 calories.)
  • Maybe more significant for weight loss is the DRS satiety factor. Eating resistant starch increases our sensation of fullness, helping us avoid overeating, or unplanned snacking.

Because every body is different, and because a few research results do not make something true for everyone, outcomes of having more dietary DRS will vary. However, many foods containing resistant starch are easily incorporated into a healthy diet. We can enjoy their proven gut nourishing benefits even while remaining hopeful, or skeptical, about other DRS advantages.

Sources: Authority Nutrition; Mercola; Precision Nutrition
Photo credit: rusvaplauke

Get Free Diabetic Supplies

For a limited time only, you can reduce diabetic supplies costs by more than 90%. Enrolling just take a few minutes. Fill out the form, speak to a representative and get diabetic supplies delivered to your door at little or no cost. Also, you will get a free Diabetes Meal Plan from a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator.

Enter your information below to see if you qualify.

By clicking Submit, you agree to send your info to InformationAboutDiabetes.com who may contact you with updates and information and we agree to use it according to our privacy policy.

More Articles

Chamomile tea has long been prized for its calming properties, but few people realize it’s also beneficial for glucose regulation. Traditionally,...

Matcha tea is a rich, creamy, full-bodied beverage with amazing nutritional properties that address several diabetes health concerns. The trace...

One way to ensure our body gets a variety of nutrients is eating nutrient-dense foods, and one of the most nutrient-dense foods on our planet is...

It would be interesting to know how many people with diabetes actually use blood glucose control solutions to regularly check the accuracy of...

A mood is an internal state or condition of feeling. It colors everything else we experience, much like colored sunglasses add a tint to...

More Articles

It would be interesting to know how many people with diabetes actually use blood glucose control solutions to regularly check the accuracy of...

Any sweetener you use to replace table sugar is a sugar substitute. One type of sugar substitute is artificial sweetener. Three other types...

One way to ensure our body gets a variety of nutrients is eating nutrient-dense foods, and one of the most nutrient-dense foods on our planet is...

Chamomile tea has long been prized for its calming properties, but few people realize it’s also beneficial for glucose regulation. Traditionally,...

Diabetes is a health condition that disrupts the body’s normal production of insulin. Currently, more than one million Americans are diagnosed...

The HbA1c blood test, more commonly known as the A1C, is both a very useful and a very cool calculation of your average blood glucose levels over...

A mood is an internal state or condition of feeling. It colors everything else we experience, much like colored sunglasses add a tint to...

Matcha tea is a rich, creamy, full-bodied beverage with amazing nutritional properties that address several diabetes health concerns. The trace...

Oil pulling therapy derives from Ayurveda, a holistic healing system developed thousands of years ago in India. Ayurvedic medicine maintains that...

You may think beer, wine, and liquor would be categorized as food, but in reality, alcohol is a drug. Just like medications, alcohol has powerful...

The different sugar content of fruits can be confusing when you are trying to manage your...

A diabetes meal plan is a guide indicating what types of foods, and how much of them, people should eat at meal and snack time. Following a meal...

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes...

This article was written exclusively for Information About Diabetes by Sarah Havemann, a 21-year-old type 1 diabetic who developed the disease...

There are many causes for both male and female hair loss, including heredity, diet and illness. Could taking prescription insulin be one more...