6 Tips for a Thinner Thanksgiving Weekend

It's hard to pay attention to healthy eating advice on the one day of the year when it's not just acceptable - but encouraged - to go overboard.

Yet Thanksgiving can be a slippery slope for diabetics, which is why it's important to mentally and physically prepare for the big day.

The following tips will not only help you navigate turkey day with ease, but can also ensure you have a thinner Thanksgiving weekend.

1. Eat before you eat.

Whether it's Thanksgiving meal itself or dinners out with family and friends, make sure to keep your blood sugar stable by eating before you actually sit down for an indulgent meal. This will ensure you don't "save" your appetite and accidentally go overboard at the main event.

Fill up on snacks with a good balance of protein and healthy fat, like nuts, seeds, cheese or avocado, while being mindful of calories and carbohydrates, too.

2. Don't stand near the snacks.

Research suggests that mere proximity to food can make you eat more of it. While chatting it up with family over cocktails, position yourself far from the appetizer trays.

If you're hosting your own Thanksgiving, serve the food buffet style so it's not a table-sitting temptation for seconds or thirds.

3. Up your exercise.

An all-or-nothing mentality is easy to slip into on holiday weekends, but don't think you've entirely blown it if you happen to indulge more than usual. Even a quick walk before and after the big meal can offset some of the calories, boost your metabolism and balance your blood sugar.

Commit to exercising at least 30 minutes every day during Thanksgiving weekend, and you'll avoid the lethargy that comes from overeating.

4. Drink wisely.

You can certainly enjoy a drink or two on Thanksgiving, but drink responsibly - and wisely. Alcohol tends to lower inhibitions around food, causing people to eat more. It also affects your blood sugar levels, so stick with low-carb drinks like wine, champagne, or spirits.

5. Be mindful of your portions.

Feel free to fill up your plate on turkey day, but make sure it mostly contains vegetables and lean protein.

Holiday favorites like stuffing, cranberry sauce and even mashed potatoes will rack up the calories and carbohydrates, so choose smaller portions of those.

6. Save your carbs for indulgences.

Keep track of your daily carbohydrate intake, and save those carbs for the foods you really want to enjoy. If you have a sweet tooth, skip the potatoes and have a slice of pumpkin pie, for example.

Try to opt for healthy carbs - the ones that come from whole grains or vegetables - and continue to monitor your blood sugar after the big meal to ensure you're in a safe range.

Source:
Live Science

Image courtesy of tiramisustudio/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Get a Free Diabetes Meal Plan

Get a free 7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan from Constance Brown-Riggs who is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and who is also a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Just enter in your email below to download your free Diabetes Meal Plan.

By clicking Submit, you agree to send your info to InformationAboutDiabetes.com who may contact you with updates and information and we agree to use it according to our privacy policy.

More Articles

Limiting our intake of highly processed foods, and eating more whole and lightly processed fare can boost our nutrient and fiber intake, lower...

Chamomile tea has long been prized for its calming properties, but few people realize it’s also beneficial for glucose regulation. Traditionally,...

Today, the healing benefits of essential oils are more than the claims of ancient tradition and alternative medicine. They are increasingly the...

The different sugar content of fruits can be confusing when you are trying to manage your...

There is nothing close to a one-size-fits-all exercise program for those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The best general advice is to...

More Articles

Today, the healing benefits of essential oils are more than the claims of ancient tradition and alternative medicine. They are increasingly the...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

Two of the most common symptoms of diabetes are increased thirst and increased urine production. These symptoms are so prevalent in diabetics that...

The different sugar content of fruits can be confusing when you are trying to manage your...

Chamomile tea has long been prized for its calming properties, but few people realize it’s also beneficial for glucose regulation. Traditionally,...

People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have successfully competed in the Olympic Games. Their amazing stories prove that diabetes is no match for...

Explaining diabetes to children can seem like a daunting task, but in reality, it is no more difficult than discussing anything else important....

Diabetes is a complex disease, affecting virtually every part of the body. The damage it does, to nerve endings, blood vessels, organs, and the...

If your child has diabetes, you want him or her to be safe while in school and to have the same educational opportunities as other children....

The American Diabetes Association estimates that more than 7 million people in the United States have diabetes but don’t know it yet. These people...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

While some celebrities aren't quick to talk about living with diabetes, others are quite transparent and inspiring - acting as advocates for the...

People with diabetes are about twice as likely to experience heart disease as those without the condition, making cardiovascular health a critical...

All diabetics know that maintaining proper blood sugar levels is the lifeline...

Pilates is an exercise method proven to improve flexibility, strength, coordination, muscular stamina, balance, and posture. Many Pilates...