Lifestyle intervention programs can save patients money

Intensive lifestyle intervention programs can save type 2 diabetes patients more than $140 a month in pharmacy costs, according to data presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress Meeting in Philadelphia.

Endocrine Today reports that the study followed 36 patients, 27 of whom had type 2 diabetes. All were enrolled in a 16-week lifestyle intervention program called the Wellness Life Program.

In general, the main two goals of lifestyle intervention programs are weight loss and physical activity.

Before starting the program, 22 percent of patients were on one medication, 45 percent were on on two medications and 33 percent were on at least three medications.

After the 16-week program, patients decreased their insulin doses by 46 percent and reduced their oral medication by 16 percent overall.

Patients reduced their body mass index to 37.23 from 40.3. They also saw a 0.7 percent reduction in HbA1c, a lab test that shows the average amount of glucose in the blood over a three-month period.

A 30-day supply of diabetes medication was $269.62 after the intervention. The average savings was $142.92 per patient, per month, according to Endrocrine Today.

John G. Evans, MD led the team of researchers in the endocrinology group-based study in Jacksonville, Florida.

“We were very excited by that clinical improvement and their overall glycemic profile,” said Evans in Endocrine Today.

“These results illustrate the positive impact a lifestyle intervention can have on medication expenditures in obese, overweight patients with diabetes. Future projects will include targeting a larger population to establish cost savings as well as enhanced care with our intervention. Employing these programs within an endocrinology practice achieves improved patient care, safe medication adjustments and reduced medication expenditures,” said Evans.

The high cost of diabetes

People diagnosed with diabetes have medical costs that are about 2.3 higher than people without diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association.

The national cost of diabetes in the Us in 2007 exceeded $174 billion, according to the American Diabetes Association. This includes $116 billion in excess medical expenditures attributed to diabetes and an additional $58 billion in reduced national productivity due to absenteeism, reduced productivity, and lost productive capacity due to early mortality.

The mean cost for hospitalization for patients with diabetes in 2008 was $10,937 compared with $8,746 for patients without diabetes, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Almost one-in-four hospital dollars go to treat people with diabetes.

Source: Endocrine Today, American Diabetes Association

More Articles

Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities....

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

More Articles

Many diabetics struggle to control the sudden blood sugar spikes that can occur after meals. Knowing why blood sugar spikes happen and making...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

People often get diabetes and hypoglycemia confused with one another, believing that they are two different names for the same condition. In...

Diabetes is a health condition that disrupts the body’s normal production of insulin. Currently, more than one million Americans are diagnosed...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

With diabetes, it all used to be really simple: Type 1 diabetes was known as “childhood-onset,” and type 2 was “adult-onset” diabetes. The cause...

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Everyone from grandmothers to physicians tout oatmeal's wholesome goodness and health benefits. But, is oatmeal good for diabetics? Limited...

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

Improving your A1C reading requires you to maintain consistently healthy blood...

While most physicians will tell you that your blood glucose will not be impacted by a flu shot, anecdotally there are reports of increased...

You may think beer, wine, and liquor would be categorized as food, but in reality, alcohol is a drug. Just like medications, alcohol has powerful...

The medical community relies heavily on the goodwill of its citizens, as giving blood and organ donations help save thousands of lives every year...

There are several misconceptions about Diabetes. Learn more about the top misconceptions vs. facts surrounding Type 2 Diabetes below.

86...