Is Matcha Good for Diabetes?

Matcha tea is a rich, creamy, full-bodied beverage with amazing nutritional properties that address several diabetes health concerns.

The trace minerals, vitamins, fiber, and powerful antioxidants in matcha tea stabilize glucose levels, help lower high blood pressure, and protect against cardiovascular disease. Plus, matcha calms the mind and body, and may enhance mood.

Because it has almost no calories and contains fiber, matcha is also good for weight loss, or maintenance. Research suggests it may boost metabolism, and helps burn fat.

Why Matcha’s Different

Matcha tea is actually powdered green tea, and is the only type of tea where the entire leaf is consumed. Preparing matcha is the focus of Japanese tea ceremonies, a meditative ritual of tea preparation and refreshment that provides a deep sense of peace, and well-being.


To grow leaves for matcha tea, farmers cover their plants with a heavy shade cloth for the 21 days preceding each May harvest. This process creates thinner leaves with superior taste and texture.

For top quality matcha the youngest and smallest leaves are harvested by hand, and briefly steamed to stop any fermentation. Then, the leaves are dried, baled, and placed in cold storage to age.

Matcha Versatile Powder

One cup of matcha tea has the nutrient content of ten regularly brewed cups of green tea, but we don’t have to drink matcha to reap its health benefits. There are many ways to incorporate this powerful jewel-green powder into our diet. For instance:

  • Delightful Dressing. We can whisk together olive oil, apple cider vinegar, dashes of salt, and pepper with some matcha powder to make a dressing for green salads, zucchini noodles (zoodles), or shredded Brussels sprouts.
  • Better Butter. Our butter might taste better when blended with matcha: slowly mix a couple teaspoons of matcha powder into a softened butter stick.
  • Fun Frosting. A colorful option is adding a two tablespoons of matcha powder to light buttercream frosting. Not only does the matcha add nutrient value, and a slightly sweet flavor, it gives the frosting a beautiful green tint.

Since matcha powder tends to clump, it’s always best to put it through a small sieve just before use.


Making Matcha Tea

The traditional method of making matcha requires a small bowl, and a bamboo whisk to froth the tea. However, we can prepare matcha using a regular cup or mug, and a teaspoon:

  1. Heat spring, or filtered water.
  2. Add a few drops of heated water to one or two sifted teaspoons of matcha powder; mix with the spoon.
  3. Add six ounces of hot water, and stir.
  4. Sip, and enjoy.

Kept well-sealed in the fridge, matcha will last weeks or months, though for best flavor it should be consumed sooner instead of later. A quality grade of matcha for tea drinking can cost up to $35 for 20 servings; however, lesser grades are suitable for blending matcha into smoothies, lattes, or recipes.

Though drinking matcha will likely not interfere with medications, it never hurts to check with a pharmacist or doctor.


Sources: Dr. Weil, Clean Plates, Matcha Source
Photo: Pixabay


More Articles

Having diabetes is cause for concern, however it doesn’t mean that you need to eliminate all of your favorite foods from your diet completely....

With diabetes becoming more of an epidemic each and every day, being knowledgeable about the disease, its effects on the body as well as ways to...

If you’re a diabetic or live with one, it can be tough trying to figure out the best foods to eat because your priority is to control your blood...

In this post, I will show you the 10 best ice creams for diabetics.

When you think of sweetened foods that a diabetic shouldn’t consume,...

If you’re living with diabetes, snacking is a necessity because going for more than 3-4 hours without eating can be detrimental to your health....

More Articles

For diabetics, choosing healthy snacks can be a daunting task.

A good rule of thumb is to pick out snacks that are rich in protein, fiber,...

According to information available through the National Institutes of Health, there’s an estimated 462 million people in the world who are...

Eleven Clinical Studies

After eleven clinical studies and 300,000 participants, researcher Vasanti Malik and her team of researchers...

Diabetic women often have a harder time losing weight than non-diabetic women. A study funded by Jenny Craig proved that diabetic women have an...

Many recent studies have proved that magnesium levels are lower in patients with diabetes than in non-diabetics. This magnesium...

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes...

Some of us might be thrilled if we could manage our blood sugar by sitting in a hot tub or sauna, instead of working up a sweat biking, or using...

Cooking and baking with the ancient cereal grain sorghum has health benefits for people with diabetes, and those with weight control issues....

When it comes to certain foods, there are always questions as to whether or not a diabetic can have them without...

With its slightly nutty flavor, chewy texture, and nutritional punch farro is an ancient whole grain worth a place in our pantry.

Farro...

Salads are good example of foods that type 2 diabetics can enjoy with relatively low guilt. With the right greens and other elements added, salad...

Remaining gainfully employed is important to many people. Those who live with any form of diabetes may find that some lines of work are more...

Learning that you have diabetes does mean making some lifestyle changes. One of the areas that needs attention is your diet. Most people find that...

One of the more challenging aspects of life as a type 2 diabetic is managing your diet. There’s often the temptation to avoid certain foods...

The green, heavily ridged acorn squash is plentiful in the marketplace this time of year. Though, Acorn squash has a high glycemic index rank of...