A Device That Increases Our Activity Level While We Sit

Because we are an inventive species, there is a way to stay more active while working at our desk, or watching TV—without standing up.

The HOVR is a device that promotes natural, intuitive movement while we sit. It’s the brainchild of physical medicine and rehabilitation physician Dr. Ron Mochizuki, and his friend John Godoy, a professional trainer.

There are two versions of the HOVR. One utilizes a portable stand that can be placed in front of the sofa, under the kitchen table, or beneath a computer desk. The second version attaches to and hangs from the underside of a desk or table. Placing our feet on the foot-bar of either HOVR version allows our legs to engage in a variety of swinging, and circular motions.

HOVR and Health

As when we walk, our muscles contract while using the HOVR, so the activity stimulates the blood circulation so important for cardiovascular, and cognitive health. The gentle, non-weight bearing motion also benefits joint function, and helps us burn off some calories.

Using HOVR in a leisurely way through an eight-hour workday will burn about the same calories as a 45 minute leisurely walk. However, the device can also be used to raise heart rates to a level of moderate, or more vigorous exercise—there's an app to help with that. An optional activity tracker, for iOS or Android, lets users know how far they’ve “traveled” on their HOVR.

Independent testing at the University of Illinois Kinesiology department confirmed that using the HOVR burns more calories than regular sitting, and that continuous use does not interfere with mental productivity. The device was also given a NEAT certification.

NEAT, which stands for Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis, is trademarked by the Mayo Clinic. NEAT focus is on the daily calories people burn while doing everyday, non-exercise activities. Companies can send products such as HOVR to the Mayo Clinic for NEAT evaluation, and certification lets customers know the device effectively helps people meet activity or nutrition goals.

HOVR and Diabetes

For those with diabetes the problem with sitting too much is the way it inhibits insulin-driven functions, such as the cell and muscle systems that process blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglycerides. We require movement that contracts our muscles to keep these functions activated. Since many of our jobs require hours of sitting - and regularly getting up to move about can be problematic - using HOVR might be an activity solution for some individuals.

Because the HOVR can easily be placed in front of any couch, or chair, including a wheelchair, it could also be an ideal exercise option for individuals with severe neuropathy, poor balance, or other mobility issues. The device may help people better manage their blood sugar as well, and research studies looking into this are planned.

Learn more about this device, and view it in action, at the HOVR website (link below).

Sources: HOVR website; Mayo Clinic
Photo credit: HOVR

More Articles

Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities....

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

More Articles

Insulin injections are a way of life for many people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but for some people, they can be a little intimidating at...

With diabetes, it all used to be really simple: Type 1 diabetes was known as “childhood-onset,” and type 2 was “adult-onset” diabetes. The cause...

There’s something inherently playful about bouncing, which is why so many people enjoy rebounding. Rebounding, or exercising on a mini-trampoline...

Everyone from grandmothers to physicians tout oatmeal's wholesome goodness and health benefits. But, is oatmeal good for diabetics? Limited...

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

Improving your A1C reading requires you to maintain consistently healthy blood...

Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities....

You may think beer, wine, and liquor would be categorized as food, but in reality, alcohol is a drug. Just like medications, alcohol has powerful...

While most physicians will tell you that your blood glucose will not be impacted by a flu shot, anecdotally there are reports of increased...

With such a marked increase in the number of new diabetes cases, more people are wondering if type 1 diabetes...

Experts estimate that somewhere in the world a person with diabetes will lose a lower extremity every half minute due to a wound. One of the...

One of the hardest parts about adopting a low-carb diet is giving up traditional baked goods and sweets. The good news, however, is that low-carb...

The medical community relies heavily on the goodwill of its citizens, as giving blood and organ donations help save thousands of lives every year...

There are several misconceptions about Diabetes. Learn more about the top misconceptions vs. facts surrounding Type 2 Diabetes below.

86...