Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetes?

Everyone from grandmothers to physicians tout oatmeal's wholesome goodness and health benefits. But, is oatmeal good for diabetics? Limited evidence shows that consuming whole grains, including oats, is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, according to Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Oatmeal's High Fiber Content

The secret is oatmeal's high dietary fiber content. Dietary fiber comes from the part of plants that enzymes in your intestinal tract cannot digest. It's a form of carbohydrates and lignin that moves quickly through your body and helps the digestive tract function properly. Fiber provides a feeling of fullness, too.

Oatmeal contains about 4 grams of fiber per serving of ½-cup of dry or 1 cup cooked oatmeal. The recommended daily intake of fiber is 14 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. According to Mayo Clinic, that's about 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day for average women and 30 to 38 grams a day for average men.

Fiber promotes glucose tolerance and helps control blood sugar levels. That's why the American Dietetic Association (ADA) recommends that diabetics increase their fiber intake as part of a healthy eating plan.

Whole grains high in fiber content are an essential part of this plan. Diabetics should try to consume at least three servings of whole-grain foods daily, according to the ADA. Whole-grain foods with so-called “healthy” carbohydrates include oatmeal, brown rice, buckwheat, whole wheat bread and cornbread.

Other Foods High In Dietary Fiber

Other foods high in dietary fiber include vegetables and fruits, nuts, legumes (beans, peas and lentils), whole-wheat flour and wheat bran.

To keep blood sugar stable, diabetics must keep their carbohydrate, fat and protein intake in balance. Carbohydrates affect a person's blood sugar more than other types of foods, so limiting the consumption of foods rich in carbohydrates is crucial.

The ADA cautions that there's no set diet or meal plan that applies to all diabetics. People with diabetes should consult a registered dietitian to design a healthful meal plan.

A healthy meal plan, along with proper medication and physical exercise, is crucial to helping diabetics manage their disease.

Sources: Mayo Clinic, Department of Health and Human Services, American Dietetic Association
Photo: Pixabay

Get a Free Diabetes Meal Plan

Get a free 7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan from Constance Brown-Riggs who is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and who is also a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Just enter in your email below to download your free Diabetes Meal Plan.

By clicking Submit, you agree to send your info to InformationAboutDiabetes.com who may contact you with updates and information and we agree to use it according to our privacy policy.

More Articles

Limiting our intake of highly processed foods, and eating more whole and lightly processed fare can boost our nutrient and fiber intake, lower...

Chamomile tea has long been prized for its calming properties, but few people realize it’s also beneficial for glucose regulation. Traditionally,...

Today, the healing benefits of essential oils are more than the claims of ancient tradition and alternative medicine. They are increasingly the...

The different sugar content of fruits can be confusing when you are trying to manage your...

There is nothing close to a one-size-fits-all exercise program for those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The best general advice is to...

More Articles

Keeping your blood sugar levels under control can be tough. There are so many factors that can affect blood sugar, like exercise, food, illness,...

Today, the healing benefits of essential oils are more than the claims of ancient tradition and alternative medicine. They are increasingly the...

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed...

Two of the most common symptoms of diabetes are increased thirst and increased urine production. These symptoms are so prevalent in diabetics that...

The different sugar content of fruits can be confusing when you are trying to manage your...

Most people with insulin-dependent diabetes use syringes and lancets every day. However, many of them do not know how to dispose of these...

Explaining diabetes to children can seem like a daunting task, but in reality, it is no more difficult than discussing anything else important....

Diabetes is a complex disease, affecting virtually every part of the body. The damage it does, to nerve endings, blood vessels, organs, and the...

People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have successfully competed in the Olympic Games. Their amazing stories prove that diabetes is no match for...

If your child has diabetes, you want him or her to be safe while in school and to have the same educational opportunities as other children....

Do not let pictures of yoga experts with their bodies twisted into bizarre, compact shapes fool you. Even people with stiff muscles, creaky joints...

The American Diabetes Association estimates that more than 7 million people in the United States have diabetes but don’t know it yet. These people...

While some celebrities aren't quick to talk about living with diabetes, others are quite transparent and inspiring - acting as advocates for the...

People with diabetes are about twice as likely to experience heart disease as those without the condition, making cardiovascular health a critical...

Pilates is an exercise method proven to improve flexibility, strength, coordination, muscular stamina, balance, and posture. Many Pilates...